Locations And Events

As a medieval reimagination of the pokeverse, there are many events or special locations found in Aatos that haven't been introduced in any other format. This list is by no means exhaustive (in fact, it is rather exclusive), and everything below is applicable to multiple countries. As such, this page will deal in generalizations and will ignore the specific variations found on these ideas in any region. From knights jousting to colosseums hosting massive battle royals, you can find new and exciting ways to immerse your PCs in Aatos.

Colosseum

While the most famous collosseums are found in Elba, other structures or equivalent fighting institutions (such as the fight clubs in Gavent) have a similar feeling to them. Surrounded by bloodthirsty crowds, fighters, both human and pokemon, struggle to survive in brutal displays of violence and gore. Some rely on slave labor to provide entertainment, others use them as a form of entertainment and employment, and Elba uses colosseums to build one of Aatos's most powerful militaries.

Getting the PCs interested in a colosseum can happen in many ways. Sometimes, they may not have a choice. Slaves, prisoners, enemies of war, and debtors were all thrown into the the colosseum to fight for the entertainment of the crowds. They're poorly fed and often without weapons until they make a name for themselves with the local spectators. Perhaps a PC is interested in proving their power in combat, and a colosseum happened to be the most convenient place. For those not looking to actually enter into any fights, a colosseum can be a wonderful place to make money. Betting happens for every fight, and a sharp eyed spectator can make buckets of money by choosing their gladiators wisely.

Types of Colosseum Fights
There are many different ways that fights in a colosseum can occur. The more variety an entertainment institution has to offer, the more money they'll pull in. This demand for a wide variety of fighting styles means that not ever fight your PCs have in it will be the same. From a classic one on one to a battle royale, you can keep the PCs on their toes by throwing different types of battles at them. Another way to change up battles is to change the rules on who fights. One battle may be pokemon only, while the next features people and their partners fighting alongside each other, while the next day humans fight without the support of their pokemon.

One on One: This simple fight is most often a showcase between two fighters who have already proved their skill. Nobody wants to see a battle between two incompetents. Whether it be no holds barred people and their pokemon ripping at each other or a fight between two sword wielding gladiators, this battle allows individuals to truly showcase their skills for the crowd's enjoyment. A successful one on one battle against a famous gladiator will earn you instant renown in the colosseum in question and quickly increase your paycheck.

Battle Royale: In this battle, large numbers of people fight in the arena at the same time. In the end, the last person standing is crowned the victor of the match. This sort of battle is often more nuanced than a one on one battle, as you don't want to stand out so much that you're targeted, but you also need to fight enough to stay healthy enough for the final stages of the combat.

Teams: Teams of equal numbers face off against each other in either a one on one or battle royal format. This format is especially useful in real life campaigns where you want to avoid splitting the party up.

Capture the Flag: This is a variation of a team battle features two objects, loosely called flags, placed on the field. Each team's goal is to protect their own flag and steal their opponent's. When the enemy's flag is brought back to 'base', a team wins. Pokemon and trainers are not allowed within ten meters of their own flag unless they are running the enemies flag back to base. Being hit by a damaging attack causes a trainer or pokemon to drop the flag. Picking up a flag consumes the same level of action as performing a move.

Wild Beasts: In this format, people or pokemon are forced to fight against hordes of wild pokemon or single hulking behemoths. Whether the goal is to kill the wild or to capture it is completely up to the moderators to decide. No mercy can be shown to the beasts however, as they have been starved so much that they'll do anything to kill and eat you.

The Influence of the Crowd: Gladiatorial fights are like any other fight the PCs might participate in with a single exception: the presence of the crowd can either inspire or demoralize a gladiator. The effects of the crowd affect only human combatants. Treat the crowd as a single NPC whose attitude towards an individual is influenced throughout the match. There are several different ways a crowd can view a gladiator. Usually, crowds start as indifferent (unless the fighter in question is very famous). When a crowd is friendly towards a gladiator, he deals three extra points of damage with every attack. When a gladiator is lauded by the crowd, he can flinch his opponents when he rolls a 19 or 20 on an accuracy check. Inept gladiators can be disliked by the crowd, which causes them to deal three less damage with every attack. Some gladiators perform so badly that they are loathed by the crowd; these gladiators suffer a -1 to all accuracy rolls. It should be noted that the attitude towards each gladiator are tracked separately. In a fight between two pathetic gladiators, the crowd may loath both. When the two masters of the arts of war fight however, the crowd may be on their feet cheering both combatants on.

A gladiator can influence the crowd's attitude towards them in many ways during the fight. A fighter who achieves +2 attitude is liked by the crowd. He is lauded when he reaches +5 attitude. A gladiator who reaches -2 attitude is disliked, and he becomes loathed when he plummets to a -5 attitude.

Situation Consequence
Gladiator rolls natural 1 on attack roll Attitude towards gladiator worsens
Gladiator misses three times in a row Attitude towards gladiator worsens by two steps
Gladiator hits five times in a row Attitude towards gladiator increases
Gladiator scores a critical hit Attitude towards gladiator increases
Gladiator faints an opponent Attitude towards gladiator increases
Gladiator kills an opponent Attitude towards gladiator increases two steps
Gladiator unable to act for the round Attitude towards gladiator worsens

The Hunt

This event is held by nobles and royalty who are learned in the fighting arts. They, with their retinue of knights, squires, and fellow nobles, journey out into the wilderness for a morning or afternoon of hunting down pokemon. Planned weeks in advance, these events are well publicized so that the participants can gain fame and honor with their successes. A noble who does well in a hunt gains favor at court. Knights and squires who prove themselves worthy gain status, duties, and promotions from their overlords. Participants who have a particularly poor showing are often publicly ridiculed by both his peers and the peasants around him. A hunt is not to be taken lightly, as there is much to be gained from them. The rules for the hunt are as follows:

A hunt takes place over ten 'rounds'. At the end of these ten rounds, trainers bring their prizes back and points are counted. The trainer with the most points is deemed the winner. Points are earned by capturing or killing wild pokemon found on the hunt. A round is an abstract concept and has no set amount of time allotted for it. A trainer may choose to do one of two things during a round: Hunt, or Battle.

Hunting: When hunting, a trainer searches for a pokemon that they seek to capture. A trainer should roll a 1d100 and subtract their wisdom modifier. A trainer may use a single pokemon with the tracker capability to give an additional -5 to this roll. The lower the roll, the rarer the quarry that the target finds and the more points the quarry is worth if captured or killed. After a hunt round, the trainer must choose to either battle the pokemon the next round, or forgo battling the pokemon and spend more time hunting. The game hinges on a balance between knowing when a pokemon is worth battling, and when time could be better spent looking for a different quarry. The possible rolls and associated point values are as follows:

d100 result Points if Killed Points if Captured
50+ .5 1
49-30 1 2
29-15 2 4
14-6 4 8
5-0 6 12
0- 9 18

Battling: When a trainer chooses to battle a quarry, they enter into a battle much like any other wild encounter that you might give them. Their goal during this encounter is to capture or kill the pokemon before it flees. Capturing a pokemon garners the hunter more points, but failed attempts waste precious rounds that the quarry may choose to flee. In general, the lower the roll, the harder the battle should be.

The Joust

Jousting is one of the quintessential activities that a knight participates in. It's pokemon counterpart need not change dramatically from how jousts occurred during true medieval times. Two mounted knights charge at each other with lances and shields, a single rail dividing them. If you can knock your opponent out of the saddle or unconscious, you are the victor of the joust. A great deal of pageantry goes along with a joust. Pennants fill the air as nobles watch the proceedings, and knights are identified by heraldry, dress, and banners. Knights may choose to ride any pokemon that is able to be ridden with a saddle. While Ponyta and Rapidash are traditionally used by jousters, more exotic pokemon such as Zebstrika, Rhyhorn, and Togekiss may also be used.

PTA Mechanics: Since the two knights jousting are charging at each other with lances, jousts function differently than combat. For starters, no initiative is necessary in a joust; combatants hit each other simultaneously. During each run, participants make an arms attack against each other using the lance. Usually the weapons are padded and the damage is nonlethal, though variants of a traditional joust use lethal weapons. The knights' mounts may also make a melee attack against the opponent's mount at this time (if a mount faints or is unable to participate, the jouster must either supply a new mount immediately or forfeit the joust). In addition, each jouster makes a roll to unseat their opponent. This roll is 1d20 plus the jouster's strength modifier, plus half of your mount's movement capability. If one jouster rolls at least 10 higher than their opponent, then their opponent is knocked from the saddle.

PTU Mechanics: Since the two knights jousting are charging at each other with lances, jousts function differently than combat. For starters, no initiative is necessary in a joust; combatants hit each other simultaneously. During each run, participants make a basic attack against each other using the lance. Usually, the weapons are padded and the damage cannot inflict death or injuries, though variants of a traditional joust use lethal weapons. The knights' may also make a melee attack against the opponent's mount at this time (if a mount faints or is unable to participate, the jouster must either supply a new mount or immediately forfeit the joust). In addition, each jouster makes a roll to unseat their opponent. This is an opposed combat skill check where each jouster adds half of their mount's movement capability. If one jouster rolls at least 5 higher than their opponent, their opponent is knocked from the saddle.

Determining the Winner: A joust is won in one of four ways. The most complete win occurs when a knight is knocked from the saddle. A jouster also wins if he knocks his opponent unconscious. Another way to obtain victory is if you faint your opponent's mount and he has no backups. If, after three runs, neither jouster has lost, a panel of judges decides who the victor is. They determine the victor by adding all of the jousting rolls together. The jouster with the higher total wins the joust.

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